Pembroke Welsh Corgi

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  • The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is highly intelligent, loyal, able and willing to please its owner. Corgis are extremely active and are good with children so long as the dog sees humans as above him in the pack order. Protective and sturdy, they make fine guards, and excellent show and obedience dogs. Wary of strangers, it should be properly socialized and trained when it is still young. They need their humans to have a determined, consistent, loving approach, showing firm but calm leadership with proper human to canine communication to avoid over protective behaviors as an adult. They sometimes try to herd people by nipping at their heels, although they can and should be trained not to do this. The Pembroke tends to bark a lot and makes a good watchdog. If you find your dog is barking at you in order to communicate, you need to hush the dog and look into your leadership skills. A dog that is barking at you in that manner is showing signs of dominancy issues. The human handlers need to communicate to the dog that aggressiveness with other dogs is an unwanted behavior. Usually good with non-canine animals. Do not allow the Corgi to developed Small Dog Syndrome.

 

  • Height: Males 10 - 12 inches (25 - 30 cm) Females 10 - 12 inches (25 - 30 cm)
    Weight: Males 25 - 30 pounds (11 - 14 kg) Females 24 - 28 pounds (11 - 13 kg)

 

  • Corgis can be prone to back disorders, they gain weight easily. Do not overfeed for if they become fat it can cause back problems.

 

  • Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

 

  • Life expectancy is 12-15 years

 

  • The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is older than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, with the Pembroke being bred out of the Cardigan. Both Corgi varieties may be a descendant of the Keeshond, Pomeranian, Schipperkes and the Swedish Vallhund. Some say the older Cardigan was from Cardiganshire brought there by the Celts in 1200 BC. Whereas, the Pembroke's ancestors were introduced by Flemish weavers to the Celts in the 1100s. Whatever the case may be, the Cardigan and the Pembroke Welsh Corgis were interbred and considered the same breed up until 1934, when a show judge thought they were too different and separated them into two different breeds. After they were separated the Pembroke gained in popularity and is to this day more popular than the Cardigan. The name "corgi" is specific to that type of dog breed in Cymreig (Welsh). “Dog” in Cymreig (Welsh) is 'Ci' or if it is softly mutated 'Gi,' hence Corgi. The Pembroke was actually recognized by the AKC a year before the Cardigan. The Cardigan was recognized in 1935 and the Pembroke in 1934. Corgis were used as cattle drivers, vermin hunters and farm guards. They drove cattle by barking and nipping at the cattle's heels rather than just herding them. The dog's low stature helped him roll out of the way of kicking cows.